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Neuromas

7 signs that suggest you may have a neuroma in your foot

If you are experiencing one or more of these signs in the forefoot area:

  1. Localised tingling on the top of the foot, the bottom of the foot or one or two toes

  2. Localised burning on the top of the foot, the bottom of the foot or one or two toes

  3. Electric shocks on the top of the foot, the bottom of the foot or one or two toes

  4. Localised numbness on the top of the foot, the bottom of the foot or one or two toes

  5. Localised pain on the top of the foot, the bottom of the foot or one or two toes

  6. A feeling that something/ a lump is inside the ball of the foot

  7. A feeling that there is something in the shoe or a sock is bunched up

In general these symptoms are triggered when you have shoes on, they usually target the 3rd or the 4th toe, but not always!

If you experience one of these symptoms, we can certainly help you with your condition! Treatment plans vary from person to person according to your lifestyle, your age,  your activities and your general health!

But, what is a neuroma? A neuroma is a thickening of a nerve. Increasing the diameter of the nerve is a way for the foot to protect itself from repetitive pressure, tension or compression. Neuromas take years to develop, they become painful when they reach a certain width and when they are triggered by certain types of shoes.

The most common neuroma in the foot is called Morton’s neuroma and it affects the 3rd and 4th toes


5 risk factors of having a neuroma

Some are more at risk of developing neuromas than others. Think of everyone that puts a lot of pressure on the ball of their feet:

  1. Chronic wear of high heels.

  2. People who have dysfunctional big toe like a bunion or osteo-arthritis of the 1st MPJ

  3. Pointy shoes

  4. Non supportive shoes with someone who have hyperlaxity

  5. Being a runner. Female runners are reported to have a higher risk of having neuromas   



8 tips to try at home to reduce your neuroma symptoms


It is about giving room to the forefoot in your daily life. Think of a way to minimise the compression between the bones of your big toe and the little toe.


  1. Wear open shoes as much as you can

  2. Go for wider shoes (not necessarily bigger shoes)

  3. Choose expandable materials

  4. Buy your shoes at the end of the day

  5. Avoid pointy shoes, or high heels

  6. When you tie your shoes, skip the eyelet that’s first or second to the bottom, then weave the laces normally through the top. This will give more room to the bones of the big toe and the 5th (metatarsal heads)

  7. Try wearing your shoes without their inner soles (to give more room to your forefoot)

  8. Avoid flat shoes

  9. Avoid flexible shoes




If these tips are not helping, call us at 08 9009 4009 and our team will take care of you!

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